What is supply?

Supply is the estimated number of employed people in the workforce that meet your search criteria.



What can I use this data for?

You can use supply data to understand the talent pool for different roles or locations. Across our tools, supply numbers are always for all employers in your searched locations. In other words, we aren’t able to show supply for specific employers. 



Acquire: Where do you get your supply data?

In general, we believe national government censuses and labor market surveys provide the most reliable foundation for estimating supply. Censuses are usually conducted every five to ten years, while labor force surveys are often updated yearly. While some of this data is publicly accessible, we often collaborate with local statistical authorities to acquire sources that aren’t available to the general public.


Though we believe that government data provides the best basis for our supply calculations, we also realize that it is not granular enough to estimate supply at the skill level, nor is it updated frequently enough to indicate real-time market conditions.


To get more precise and timely supply estimates for attributes like skills, we augment our government data with demand data based on job postings from job boards, corporate sites, partner feeds, news sites, staffing websites, and applicant tracking systems. Because job postings are constantly being published and removed, this data is updated much more frequently than government data. Learn more about our demand data.



Organize: How do you prepare your supply data for analysis? 

Generally, government entities provide supply data at varying levels of geography and occupation. In order to accurately compare supply figures across countries, we must map all of our data to a standard taxonomy. 


To standardize location types, we map supply to the metropolitan statistical area (MSA) or local country equivalent, since this is the level at which governments typically publish supply figures. If a nation’s government does not use a system similar to MSAs to demarcate their country, we aggregate supply data in a way that is comparable.


To standardize occupations, we map local occupational taxonomies to the Standard Occupation Classification (SOC) system, developed by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. We believe that the SOC system provides the best framework for our analysis due to its balance of breadth and depth and the fact that it is regularly reviewed by organizational psychologists.



Analyze: How do you calculate supply?

We estimate supply using data from national governments’ census bureaus, and labor market surveys. With this government data as an anchor, we estimate supply for more granular attributes (like skills and certifications) using patterns found in job postings from the past few years.



Deliver: How do you represent supply data?

We represent supply as an estimated number of individuals that match your search criteria.




More about supply:


What countries do you have supply data for?

Why isn't supply data available for my country?

What location types do you have supply data for?

What search filters impact supply?

Why do you use government data as the basis for supply?

Why don’t you include unemployed people in your supply estimate?

Do you include non-citizens in your supply estimates?

Which employment survey does my country use?

Why do different countries show different minimum supply figures?

What is the SOC system?



What countries do you have supply data for?
We provide supply data for the following countries:


ArgentinaGermany
Poland
AustraliaIndiaRussia
AustriaIrelandSingapore
BelgiumItalySouth Africa
BrazilJapanSweden
CanadaMexicoSwitzerland
ChinaNetherlandsUnited Kingdom
CzechiaNew ZealandUnited States
DenmarkNorway
FrancePhilippines



Why isn’t supply data available for my country?

In many countries, government data simply is not available. In others, the data is available, but the coverage within the country is uneven, or the data itself is unreliable. In these instances, we prefer not to provide data at all than to provide data that doesn't meet our standards.



What location types do you have supply data for?

We calculate supply data at the metropolitan statistical area (MSA) level. If your search includes a location that is less granular (e.g. state or city), the supply will be that of the parent MSA. If your search includes a location that is larger than the MSA (e.g. state or country), the supply will be the sum that location’s MSAs combined.



What search filters impact supply?

We are able to provide supply data for some (but not all) of the job attributes in our search experience: function, occupation, industry (when available), title, skills, certifications, experience level and keywords. In other words, adding these filters to your search will change the supply.


Unfortunately, we can’t provide supply figures for education level and employment type. If your search includes either of these attributes, supply is calculated as if those criteria were not part of your search.



Why do you use government data as the basis for supply?

In 2018, we had more than 340 million social profiles in our database which our data scientists have used for numerous analyses. Even though we continue to build upon this data, we are not comfortable using it as the sole basis for our supply numbers. Instead, we prefer to use government supply data as a foundation and then apply proprietary algorithms based on patterns identified in thousands of other sources.


Why don’t we trust social profile data on its own? You may remember the story of the 1948 U.S. presidential election from your history or statistics classes. The Chicago Tribune incorrectly called the election in favor of challenger Thomas Dewey over incumbent Harry Truman based on a flawed political poll that included significant sampling errors. Voters were polled by telephone, and at the time, only well-to-do people (who were more likely to vote for Dewey) owned phones. As a result, the sample population did not reflect the true voting population. 


We believe that social profile data presents similar sampling challenges that are difficult to account for. Social data alone does not evenly reflect all potential candidates in a market. Certain types of candidates, like white-collar workers, are far more likely to have professional social profiles than blue collar workers, engineers, and technicians.


Though our team of data scientists considered using only social profiles to estimate supply, after thorough testing, we found significant issues with the analysis due to sampling bias. Because government entities are much more purposeful in identifying samples that reflect general populations, we use government data as a foundation and overlay patterns derived from harvested data.



Why don’t you include unemployed people in your supply estimate?

Unfortunately, many countries around the world lack reliable unemployment data. In order to ensure that our supply data is comparable across locations, we exclude unemployed individuals from all of our supply estimations. 



Do you include non-citizens in your supply estimates?

Because most government entities include all employed persons irrespective of their citizenship status in their census and labor market surveys, non-citizens are included in our supply estimates. However, we do not have data on the citizenship status of working populations.



Which employment survey does my country use?


Country

Supply data source

Argentina

Census values and the Annual Survey of Urban Households from the National Institute of Statistics and the Census of Argentina

Australia

Census values and labor force survey from the Australian Bureau of Statistics

Austria

Census values and labor force survey from Austria Statistik and EuroStat

Belgium

Census values from StatBel and labor force surveys from StatBel and EUROSTAT

Brazil

Census values from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics

Canada

Census values and National Household Survey (NHS) from Statistics Canada

China

Census values from the National Bureau of Statistics

Czechia

Labour Force Survey from Czech Republic Statistical Office (CZSO) and EuroStat

Denmark

Register Based Labor Force Data from Statistics Denmark

France

Census values from the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE)

Germany

German Statutory Pension Insurance Scheme from the Federal Employment Agency

India

Census values and Labor Force Survey from the Indian Ministry of Statistics and Implementation

Ireland

Census values and Labor Force Survey from the Central Statistics Office (CSO)

Italy

Census values and Employment, earnings and social security contributions from Italian Statics (IStat)

Japan

Census values and labor force survey from the Statistics Bureau of Japan

Mexico

Census values from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography

Netherlands

Labor force surveys from Statistics Netherlands and EUROSTAT

New Zealand

Labor force survey from NZ Stats

Norway

Employment statistics from Statistics Norway

Philippines

Census values and labor force surveys from the Philippines Statistics Authority

Poland

Labor force Survey from Statistics Poland

Russia

Census values from the Russian Federation Federal State Statistics Service

Singapore

Census values and labor force survey from Statistics Singapore

South Africa

Census values and the Labour Market Dynamics survey from Statistics South Africa

Sweden

Census values and labor force surveys from Statistics Sweden


Switzerland

Census values and Swiss Labor Force Survey (SLFS) from the Federal Office of Statistics 

United Kingdom

Census values from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), National Records of Scotland, and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NIRSA)

United States

Census values from the Occupational Employment Survey (OES) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)



Why do different countries show different minimum supply figures?

While using TalentNeuron, you may notice that supply sometimes appears as “<100” or “<50” for certain searches, and that these minimum values differ between locations. We determine a country’s “supply threshold” based on its population and our confidence level in showing smaller supply figures. The greater a country’s population, the higher the threshold.” You can find each country’s supply threshold below:


Country

Supply threshold

Argentina

25

Australia

20

Austria

30

Belgium

20

Brazil

100

Canada

20

China

500

Czechia

50

Denmark

25

France

50

Germany

50

India

500

Ireland

25

Italy

50

Japan

500

Mexico

50

Netherlands

30

New Zealand

50

Norway

20

Philippines

50

Poland

50

Russia

100

Singapore

20

South Africa

25

Sweden

25

Switzerland

25

United Kingdom

20

United States

100



What is the SOC system?

The Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system is a federal statistical standard used by U.S. federal agencies to classify workers into occupational categories for the purpose of collecting, calculating, or disseminating data. All workers are classified into a detailed occupation based on similar job duties, skills, education, or training. These detailed occupations are grouped to form broad occupations, which are rolled up into minor groups and then major groups.