Learn how to use filters to build an advanced search in Recruit and a Talent Profile in Plan.



Related articles

Search Fundamentals, Part 1: How search works

Search Fundamentals, Part 3: Example searches for Plan and Recruit 

How To: Build a search in Plan

How To: Build a search in Recruit



About searching in Plan and Recruit

In TalentNeuron Recruit, you have three options for building a search: My Company’s Postings, Paste JD, and Advanced Search. This article focuses on the Advanced Search feature, which allows you to build a search from scratch.


In TalentNeuron Plan, there are three components to a search: Location, Talent Profile, and (in certain modules), Employer. This article focuses on the Talent Profile feature, which allows you to define your talent from scratch.


Both Advanced Search and Talent Profiles require you to select different filters (like occupations and skills) to define the talent you’re interested in. These filters function (mostly) the same way in both tools. In this article, we’ll be exploring how these filters work and how you can apply them to your search.


It’s important to realize that there is no one right way to search. The real power of TalentNeuron comes from understanding how each filter works so that you can combine filters in different ways to meet your specific needs.


That being said, in most cases, we recommend creating a search using an occupation as a foundation. From there, you can choose to layer on additional filters, like skills or years of experience, further narrowing your results.



Search filters



Keywords filter

What is the keywords filter?

  • The keywords filter allows you to create searches using Boolean logic. Learn more about Boolean.


How does the keywords filter affect my search?

  • The keywords filter works by looking for your search terms throughout the entire text of a job posting.

  • The keywords filter affects demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points).


How should I use the keywords filter?

  • We recommend using the keyword filter to build complex, specific searches using Boolean logic.

  • You can also use the keywords filter to search for things that you can’t search for through our filters. For example, if you wanted to see which companies advertise ping-pong tables as part of their perks, you could add “ping pong” as a keyword.

  • We also recommend using the keyword filter to limit results by industry instead of the industry filter. For example, you can add the term “pharma” to return results related to the pharmaceutical industry.



Location (in Recruit)

What is the location filter? 

  • We identify and extract locations from job postings.


How does the location filter affect my search?

  • By applying the location filter, you’re narrowing your search to results associated with that location. 

  • Adding multiple locations to a search returns results for all of those locations. Multiple locations work together with OR logic

  • Within the location filter, countries and MSAs affect demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points). Cities and counties affect demand and salary, but not supply.


How should I use the location filter? 

  • For the best results, we recommend searching for an entire country or a metropolitan statistical area (MSA). This is partly because supply data is only available at the country and MSA level.



Function filter

What is a function? 

  • Functions are categories we created to group occupations together, allowing us to provide a higher-level view of market trends. Learn more about occupations.


How does the function filter affect my search?

  • By applying the function filter, you’re essentially adding multiple related occupations to your search at one time.

  • Adding multiple functions to a search returns results for all of those functions. Multiple functions work together with OR logic

  • If your search contains a function and an occupation, only the occupation will influence the results. This is because the occupation is a subset of the function.

  • The function filter affects demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points).


How should I use the function filter? 

  • Use the function filter on its own if you want to see data for a general type of talent, like sales talent.

  • Combine the function filter with a keyword or skills search to view a subset of a more general role. For example, if you’re interested in data scientists who work specifically in marketing, you can combine the keyword “data scientist” with the “Marketing/PR” function.



Occupation filter

What is an occupation? 

  • An occupation is a category used by governments to classify workers. At TalentNeuron, we use the United States government’s Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system. Learn more about occupations


How does the occupation filter affect my search?

  • By applying the occupation filter, you’re narrowing your search to a type of talent that is more specific than a function, but more general than a title or set of skills.

  • Adding multiple occupations to a search returns results for all of those occupations. Multiple occupations work together with OR logic

  • If your search contains a function and an occupation, only the occupation will influence the results. This is because the occupation is a subset of the function.

  • The occupation filter affects demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points).


How should I use the occupation filter?

  • The occupation filter is the most fundamental in our search experience. In most cases, we recommend building your search with an occupation as a foundation. From there, you can choose to layer on additional search criteria.

  • If you’re not sure what occupation you should choose, you can click “Full SOC list” to search for relevant occupations.



Skills and certifications filters

What are the skills and certifications filters?

  • The options you see in the filter dropdowns come from our database of 30,000 skills and certifications. We identify and extract these skills and certifications from job descriptions. Learn more about skills. 


How do the skills and certifications filters affect my search?

  • Adding multiple “required” skills or certifications narrows your results by only searching for postings and candidates that have all of those criteria. Multiple required skills and certifications work together with AND logic.

  • For this reason, we recommend limiting the number of required skills in your search.

  • In Recruit, you can use the “Alternative skills” feature to search for skills and certifications using OR logic, which will broaden your search and increase results.

  • The skills and certifications filters affect demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points).


How should I use the skills and certifications filters?

  • We generally recommend pairing one occupation with a few skills or certifications that together encapsulate your target talent.

  • If the exact skill or certification you’re looking for isn’t in our database, try searching for synonyms, abbreviations, or alternative terms. If you still can’t find it, you can add the skill or certification as a keyword.



Experience level filter

What is the experience level filter?

  • The experience level filter allows you to filter your results by three broad categories: 0-2 years, 3-7 years, and 8+ years of experience. 

  • In Plan, there is also an option to include results that aren’t associated with any level of experience. 


How does the experience level filter affect my search?

  • By applying the experience level filter, you’re narrowing your search to results that fall within your selected experience range.

  • Adding multiple experience levels to a search returns results for all of those experience levels. Multiple experience levels work together with OR logic

  • The experience level filter affects demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points).


How should I use the experience level filter?

  • You can use the experience level filter to ensure you’re only considering more junior or senior talent.

  • Alternatively, you can use higher-level skills as a proxy for seniority. 



Education level filter

What is the education level filter?

  • The experience level filter allows you to filter your results by these categories: GED/high school, associate level, bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, and doctoral degree.

  • In Plan, there is also an option to include results that aren’t associated with any level of education.


How does the education level filter affect my search?

  • By applying the education level filter, you’re narrowing your search to results for that specific degree type.

  • Adding multiple education levels to a search returns results for all of those education levels. Multiple education levels work together with OR logic.

  • The education level filter affects demand and salary only (and all metrics derived from demand). It does not affect supply.


How should I use the education level filter?

  • Generally, it’s not necessary to apply the education level filter to your search since many job postings don’t include educational requirements. 

  • Applying this filter to your search can be redundant in some cases. For example, software developers usually have a Bachelor’s degree, so including the Bachelor’s degree filter along with the software developer occupation isn’t meaningfully different from the occupation alone.

  • However, you can use the education level filter to ensure you’re only considering talent with certain degrees.



Title filter

What is the title filter?

  • We identify and extract titles from job postings. We also clean them up to remove extraneous text not related to the job. Learn more about titles.


How does the title filter affect my search?

  • By applying the title filter, you’re narrowing your search to results associated with that cleaned title.

  • Adding multiple titles to a search returns results only those exact titles. Multiple titles work together with OR logic.

  • The title filter affects demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points).


How should I use the title filter?

  • Because the title filter is so restrictive, we generally recommend using the title filter only to exclude titles you don’t want to consider.

  • If you find yourself excluding a lot of titles, try adjusting other filters to narrow your search.



Employment type filter

What is the employment type filter?

  • The employment type filter allows you to filter your results by these categories: Full-time, permanent, part-time, temporary, and contract.


How does the employment type filter affect my search?

  • By applying the employment type filter, you’re narrowing your search to results within the category you selected.

  • Adding multiple employment types to a search returns results for all of those employment types. Multiple employment types work together with OR logic.

  • The employment type filter affects demand and salary only (and all metrics derived from demand). It does not affect supply.


How should I use the employment type filter?

  • The employment type filter isn’t commonly used. However, you can apply it to ensure you’re only considering talent for certain employment types.



Industry filter (available in Recruit for searches in the U.S.)

What is an industry?

  • An industry is a category used by governments to classify businesses. At TalentNeuron, we use the United States government’s North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes.

  • The industry filter is only available for searches in the United States in Recruit.

  • 60-70% of the US-based job descriptions we harvest are tagged to an industry.


How does the industry filter affect my search?

  • By applying the industry filter, you’re narrowing your search to some of the job postings associated with a particular industry.

  • Adding multiple industries to a search returns results for all of those industries. Multiple industries work together with OR logic.

  • The industry filter affects demand, supply, and salary (and all metrics derived from those data points).


How should I use the industry filter?

  • Because we’re only able to tag 60-70% of our job postings to industries, you may want to consider adding industry terms (like “pharma” or “pharmaceuticals”) as a keyword instead of using the industry filter.